The Hydrilla Game

Tracking the Journey of an Incredibly Invasive Plant

This activity was created in conjunction with the Osceola County Hydrilla & Hygrophila Demonstration Project

This interactive lesson was inspired by the Project WET Curriculum (Water Education for Teachers) and has been adapted for the purpose of giving students a basic understanding of the life history of one of Florida’s most invasive aquatic plant species, Hydrilla verticillata.

During the activity, students pretend to be a hydrilla plant or “sprig” as they visit eight different aquatic habitat stations (aquarium, creek, drainage ditch, hydrosoil, lake, retention pond, river or spring). While visiting each station, they select a printed scenario card that describes their “existence” in the current habitat, followed by clues on where they will move next in their journey (dumped into a pond from an aquarium, etc.) For each “event” in their journey, students are given a colored bead corresponding to the habitat visited. At the end of the activity, each student’s string of beads provides a visual history of the various environments and life cycles experienced as a hydrilla plant. Students keep their string of beads and use them for discussion with classmates and family.

The Hydrilla Game was designed as an activity to enhance or support Module 2 ~ A Fish Tale presentation, but it can be used as a stand-alone or with other presentations about invasive plants.

Hydrilla Game Materials:

The Hydrilla Game - Complete Set

The Hydrilla Game - Complete Set The Hydrilla Game - Individual Set The Hydrilla Game - Scenario Cards

The Hydrilla Game - Station Cards The Hydrilla Game - Beads The Hydrilla Game - String Click on image for larger version

 


A collaboration of the UF/IFAS Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission / Invasive Plant Management Section

Center for Aquatic & Invasive Plants | 7922 NW 71st St. | Gainesville, Fl. 32653 | 352-392-6843
2009 University of Florida
Contact Us: CAIP-education@ufl.edu