Shearing

Hand Cutting, Dragging Objects (i.e. Chains, Heavy Metal Weights, Etc.) Behind Boats

Cut or shear plants at sediment level and leav or collect by hand or machine

Considerations:

  • Labor intensive
  • Most suited for small areas i.e. ponds or shores or confined areas i.e. canals
  • Applicable for submersed or emergent plants
  • Collect plants after cutting
    • To prevent jams
    • Prevent fragments from re-colonizing elsewhere in the water body
    • Need disposal site near control area to minimize costs
  • Immediate results, especially in small areas
  • May not be suitable in waters with numerous underwater obstructions (snags, rocks, pilings, etc.)
  • Re-growth may be rapid if roots are not removed
  • No water use restrictions
  • May disturb sediments depending on size and weight of dragged apparatus
  • Not selective

Examples of Feasible Control:

  • Various hand-thrown cutting blades and rakes are commercially available to shear and retrieve submersed and emergent plants in small areas (e.g. lakeshores and around boat docks)
  • South Florida Water Management District dragged heavy steel frame along bottom of canals to shear hydrilla for retrieval and removal downstream

Last updated: 28 June 2011