Search Results: node/"emersed"

Herbicide Considerations Reference Guide—Introduction

This reference guide defines the parameters considered by aquatic plant managers and FWC biologists when formulating a management plan using herbicides in Florida waters. No single herbicide is appropriate for controlling all invasive or nuisance aquatic plant infestations. Therefore, aquatic plant managers must have a thorough understanding of how each herbicide acts in Florida aquatic […]

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Frequently Asked Questions

Fishermen, boaters, swimmers and others often question the need for, and safety of, weed control programs. Following are a few of the most frequently asked questions and answers regarding Florida's aquatic plant management program. Are aquatic herbicides safe to use? All herbicides should be handled with great care, especially in their concentrated form. Once diluted […]

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Duck Hunting

Duck hunting and waterfowl habitat management are among the many uses and functions of Florida waterbodies. Most ducks in Florida are migratory, flying into the state for the winter from as far away as northernmost Canada and Alaska. The state's many wetland habitats, abundance of wintering ducks and number of public hunting areas make Florida […]

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Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is a chemical process that occurs in many forms of bacteria and virtually all plants, including aquatic plants and algae. Using just three simple ingredients (carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight) plants and bacteria are able to make their own food. Early forms of algae and bacteria were the first organisms to photosynthesize. Scientists estimate […]

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Decomposition and Sedimentation

Simply stated, decomposition is the breakdown of matter into its basic components. When discussed in terms of environmental processes, it includes the breakdown of dead organic plant material (leaves, stems, etc.) by micro-organisms. When plant material decomposes and sinks to the bottom of a waterbody, it leaves behind a layer of sediment or muck—a process […]

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Aquatic and Wetland Plants in Florida

Our state is home to hundreds of native aquatic and wetland plants that live in damp to wet soils, and some even more specialized plants that live entirely in, on, or under water; submersed plants, emersed plants (including grasses, sedges and rushes), and floating and floating-leaved plants. These plants are technically referred to as aquatic […]

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