Search Results: node/"bristle"

Scirpus validus

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Soft-stem bulrush might first be noticed as a large colony of stems growing in marshes, streams and ponds nearly throughout Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). The stems are topped by a hanging inflorescence and blooms all year. It is similar to another large native sedge, Scirpus […]

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Scirpus pungens

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Three-square is frequently found growing in fresh water to brackish marshes along the peninsula, central and western panhandle of Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). It blooms from spring to fall. Scirpus pungens occurs almost always under natural conditions in wetlands. The entire plant is eaten by […]

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Rhynchospora tracyi

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Instead of having open clusters of spikelets as some other beakrushes, Tracy’s beakrush has spherical heads of beaked spikelets. It can grow into large colonies. Some wading birds prefer Tracy’s beakrush habitat to others. Tracy’s beakrush is a beakrush sedge. from rhizomes; stems slender, […]

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Rhynchospora inundata

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Rhynchospora inundata is commonly found growing in bogs, marshes, wet flatwoods, cypres swamps and lake and pond margins nearly throughout Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). This colony-forming species is one of the largest of the beakrushes, and might easily be confused with Rhynchospora corniculata. Its seeds […]

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Fimbristylis species

Common Name(s): Online image request form Fringe-rushes might be encountered as single plants or as significant colonies growing on road-sides or in flatwoods. There are about a dozen species in Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). They look like small clumps of grass except for their distinctive inflorescences. Their spikelets do not have bristles. They are eaten by […]

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