Search Results: node/"bristle"

Paspalidium geminatum

Common Name(s): Online image request form The common native, Egyptian paspalidium, might first be encountered as long leaves on tufts of thick stems bent at the base, leaning over swamps, ponds, and wet, disturbed sites along the peninsula and Dixie county (Wunderlin, 2003). It blooms all year. Egyptian paspalidium is a grass. stem tufted, leaning […]

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Arundinaria gigantea

Common Name(s): Online image request form Switch cane is one of three native species of Arundinaria. It might be encountered as dense stands in low-lying, shady, moist to wet areas. It is easily confused with non-native bamboos. Switch cane rarely flowers. Its leaves are a preferred food of caterpillars of the southern pearly eye butterfly. […]

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Scirpus validus

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Soft-stem bulrush might first be noticed as a large colony of stems growing in marshes, streams and ponds nearly throughout Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). The stems are topped by a hanging inflorescence and blooms all year. It is similar to another large native sedge, Scirpus […]

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Scirpus pungens

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Three-square is frequently found growing in fresh water to brackish marshes along the peninsula, central and western panhandle of Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). It blooms from spring to fall. Scirpus pungens occurs almost always under natural conditions in wetlands. The entire plant is eaten by […]

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Rhynchospora tracyi

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Instead of having open clusters of spikelets as some other beakrushes, Tracy’s beakrush has spherical heads of beaked spikelets. It can grow into large colonies. Some wading birds prefer Tracy’s beakrush habitat to others. Tracy’s beakrush is a beakrush sedge. from rhizomes; stems slender, […]

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Rhynchospora inundata

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Rhynchospora inundata is commonly found growing in bogs, marshes, wet flatwoods, cypres swamps and lake and pond margins nearly throughout Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). This colony-forming species is one of the largest of the beakrushes, and might easily be confused with Rhynchospora corniculata. Its seeds […]

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Eleocharis interstincta

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes / transcript below) Online image request form This is one of the largest Eleocharis species and may first be noticed as a patch of dark green stems growing in the water on the edge of a canal, having conspicuous light brown cylindrical spikes at the tips. Eleocharis interstincta […]

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Eleocharis cellulosa

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Club-rush is a tallish sedge that can form extensive colonies, as it has in large areas of the 3-foot-deep zone of Lake Okeechobee. It is grazed by ducks and wading birds. Eleocharis cellulosa is frequently found growing in brackish and fresh water marshes along […]

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Echinochloa walteri

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form This is one of several Echinochloa species in Florida, and may be encountered growing in clumps in and beside water, or in farmlands. This species is planted for the use of many kinds of birds and is a favorite food. There are eight species […]

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Andropogon glomeratus

Common Name(s): Video ID segment (2-3 minutes) Online image request form Bushy broom grass might first be noticed as a tall blue-green grass with a large whitish, hairy top, growing along ditches. There are 17 different species and varieties of Andropogon in Florida (Wunderlin, 1998). Bushy broom grass is present in the eastern third and […]

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